Woman outraged after her neighbor’s dog believed to have frozen to death

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A woman in Manchester is outraged and speaking out after she says her neighbor’s dog, Tuffy, was left out in the cold and froze to death.

She called Manchester Animal Control on Thursday after she saw the dog lying motionless on the ground behind its home on Old Bushy Branch Road. The dog did not respond when she called his name and she feared the worst.

“It’s a mix of heartbreak because this is so senseless, and its also anger because it didn’t have to happen,” said the woman, who did not wish to be identified.

She said she had been watching the dog over the last year and had been concerned about his well-being. She noted the dog lived primarily on a chain in the backyard. She said she had called Animal Control multiple times to express her concerns. Tuffy was described as a fluffy mixed breed dog with brown and white fur.

Officials with Manchester City Animal Control confirmed that the dog did pass away but it was unclear if the dog froze to death. There were apparently symptoms of a possible illness. They stated that the dog did have access to food, water and shelter, and that they had not been called to the house before.

The neighbor said the situation is unacceptable and is worried about other dogs in her neighborhood often left outside on chains.

“I want this to be illegal,” she said. “This shouldn’t be okay.”

Is it fine to ever leave your dog outside?

Owners need to be considerate of pets and bring them inside when temperatures drop below 32 degrees fahrenheit (0 degrees celsius). If outside, pets need a warm, solid shelter like a dog house, to protect against wind and elements and insulate their body against the cold. Plenty of bedding should be provided. Once temperatures drop under 20° F (-6
° C), all owners should be aware that their dogs could potentially develop cold-associated health problems like hypothermia and frostbite.

A pet’s tolerance to cold weather varies on its breed type, size, health, body fat, and coat. The very young and very old are not able to regulate their body temperatures the same as healthy dogs in the prime of their lives, and need greater protection. Always check pet paws frequently for signs of cold weather injury as ice can accumulate between their toes, causing injury and limping. Outdoor pets need increased calories in the winter to maintain their condition and stay warm.

Certain dog breeds are more tolerant to cold weather, and even enjoy being outside during cold temperatures.

  • Tibetan Mastiff
  • Tibetan Terrier
  • Siberian Husky
  • Samoyed
  • Shiba Inu
  • Akita
  • Alaskan Malamute
  • American Eskimo Dog
  • Anatolian Shepherd
  • Bernese Mountain Dog
  • Chow Chow
  • German Shepherd
  • Greater Swiss Mountain Dog
  • Great Pyrenees
  • Karakachan Bear Dog
  • Keeshond
  • Kuvasz
  • Newfoundland
  • Norwegian Elkhound
  • Saint Bernard

Check out this image from PetPlan:

Image taken from: https://www.gopetplan.com/blogpost/cold-weather-and-dogs


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