Five Most Expensive Dog Breeds

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Please note that dog prices vary depending on the breeder, location and bloodlines. Here’s 5 of some of the most expensive dog breeds:

  1. Pharaoh Hound

Cost: Up to $6500 per pup.

Pharaoh Hounds are a medium sized dog with well defined features. They have very short, reddish toned coats and matching paw-pads and noses. They are slim dogs and have a graceful gait. They are known to be intelligent, stubborn and independent. They are an ancient dog breed and have changed little since their development more than 5,000 years ago. The Pharaoh Hound was the dog of kings and may have hunted gazelles with pharaohs, hence their name. They later made their way to Malta, and are now the national dog of Malta.  An unusual feature of the breed is their ability to “blush” when they are overly excited. These dogs have even been honored in their home land – in 1935 a burial tomb of an Egyptian Pharaoh dog in a cemetery near the Pyramid of Cheops at Giza had an inscription by the owner, “The dog which was the guard of His Majesty, Abuwtiyuw is his name,” on its tombstone. This was one of the earliest documented domestic animals whose name is known. Abuwtiyuw is believed to have been a royal guard dog who lived in the Sixth Dynasty (2345–2181 BC), and received an elaborate ceremonial burial in the Giza Necropolis at the behest of a pharaoh whose name is unknown.

Pharaoh Hound – By Pleple2000 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1244268

2.  Tibetan Mastiff

Cost: Up to $7000 per pup

The Tibetan Mastiff was developed centuries ago in Tibet and is one of the largest dogs in the world. Originally used as guard dogs for livestock and property, they can still be found performing that role, but are also quite happy living life as a family companion or show dog.

Tibetan Mastiffs can be stubborn and strong willed and need quite a bit of obedience training. However, they are known for their loyalty. In 2013, a rare red Tibetan Mastiff sold in China for a cool $1.9 million.

Tibetan Mastiff – By Dennis Jarvis from Halifax, Canada – DSCN5627, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=23450638
Chinese Bred Tibetan Mastiff – By Yeti – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3846424

3.  Löwchen

Cost: up to $7000

The Löwchen or Little Lion Dog is a small breed of dog, considered by some registries as a toy dog. In 1973 there were only 65 registered examples of the breed. The breed is traceable as far back as 1442 and they are found in many paintings, tapestries, engravings, drawings and in literature. They have a history as a companion dog to the wealthy and elite.  They have long flowing coats that come in a variety of colors. Their fur is wavy with a mix of thicker fur amongst the finer ones. The breed is non-shedding and considered hypoallergenic. These are healthy, happy and friendly companions that are active and very intelligent, so they are excellent house pets. It’s a little dog with a huge personality.

Lowchen – By Canarian – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33120446

4.  Samoyed

Cost: Up to $8000

Samoyeds, or Bjelkier as they are known in Europe, are Siberian dogs that were bred by nomadic reindeer herders for herding and pulling sleds – today they are one of the most expensive dog breeds. It’s a loving and playful breed that gets along well with its family and they are excellent companions for little children and seniors alike. They are playful, strong and alert dogs. Samoyeds’ friendly disposition makes them poor guard dogs; an aggressive Samoyed is rare. With their tendency to bark, however, they can be diligent watch dogs, barking whenever something approaches their territory.

Samoyed – By Sweetjedysamoyeds.it – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6976087

5.  English Bulldog

Cost: Up to $4000

The English Bulldog was originally bred for the bloody sport of bull baiting. Its pouty expression and wrinkly face are a large part of its charm and popularity. They are a devoted and awkward personality with a short coat that doesn’t require much brushing. They are good with children and excellent family dogs. As they age, however, their health deteriorates and they generally have short life spans of around 6 to 10 years.

English Bull dog – By Buckandsons – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33036802


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